Consuelo Jimenez Underwood: One Nation Underground: San Antonio

October 22, 2022 - January 28, 2023
  • Consuelo Jimenez Underwood: One Nation Underground

  • Ruiz-Healy Art is pleased to present two concurrent solo exhibitions from Consuelo Jimenez Underwood at both our San Antonio and New York City galleries. In 2022, the artist was awarded the Latinx Artist Fellowship, a first-of-its-kind initiative that recognizes 15 of the most compelling Latinx visual artists working in the United States today. The artist is also the subject of a publication, Consuelo Jimenez Underwood: Art, Weaving, Vision, a recent comprehensive analysis of her work and impact on feminist textile art history. This is the artist’s first solo exhibition with the gallery.

  • 'Jimenez Underwood's compelling visual narratives express the inter-connectedness of postmodern societies, insisting on beauty in the midst of struggle and...

    Consuelo Jimenez Underwood

    One Nation Underground, 2013 

    Stitched, embroidered. Nylon, cotton, silk fabric; leather; cotton thread

    56 X 90 in

    142.24 x 228.6 cm

    "Jimenez Underwood's compelling visual narratives express the inter-connectedness of postmodern societies, insisting on beauty in the midst of struggle and celebrating the experience of being in nepantla, as this experience has enabled the artist to see and understand the world through a tricultural lens."

     

    - Clara Roman, "Odio , Flags, the Sacred, and a Different America in Consuelo Jimenez Underwood's Fiber Art," Consuelo Jimenez Underwood: Art, Weaving, Vision, Duke University Press, 2022

  • Representing the Red-Tailed Texas Blackbird, a species which migrates back and forth between Mexico and the U.S., the red strips...

    Consuelo Jimenez Underwood

    Broken: 13 Undocumented Birds, 2021

    Woven and stitched. Wire, linen, cotton and metallic threads

    70 x 47 in

    177.8 x 119.4 cm

    Representing the Red-Tailed Texas Blackbird, a species which migrates back and forth between Mexico and the U.S., the red strips of fabric are forcibly separated by long, dark, and narrow weavings which resemble sections of the border wall.

     

    The artist states, "Invariably, as the main flock passes north over the border, a small group will dive and slam right into the wall, perishing instantly. Broken birds fall, to be devoured by the harsh ecosystem of the borderlands. The moment of impact, the violence, the sorrow, the mystery of this frequent occurrence haunts me."

  • 'What if we had flowers instead of stars in our flag’s canton? Would our ecological gaze be sharpened? Is it...

    Consuelo Jimenez Underwood

    Border Flowers Flag, 2008

    Stitched, embroidered. Silkscreened over dyed recycled cotton and silk fabrics, silk, cotton embroidery threads

    56 x 23 in

    142.2 x 58.4 cm

    "What if we had flowers instead of stars in our flag’s canton?  Would our ecological gaze be sharpened? Is it possible to stitch a flag that is imbued with the feminine gaze, from ground zero, the kitchen? I embroidered white silk inside the canton and defined four southern state border flowers: the Poppy, Saguaro, Yucca, and Bluebonnet. I over-dyed worn kitchen towels and Mexican Indigenous flower-embroidered tortilla cloths cut into strips, resewn into stripes and created a triangular flag. Symbolically, two American kitchens, unknown to each other, are united in their concern for the American flower eco-system."

    - Consuelo Jimenez Underwood
  • 'The dominant motifs of this series are the simple tortilla and the basket, both symbols of Indigenous peoples particularly renowned...

    Consuelo Jimenez Underwood

    Undocumented Tortilla Basket, 2008

    Twining. Barbed wire, aluminum, and steel wire

    9 x 29 in diameter

    22.9 x 73.7 cm diameter

    "The dominant motifs of this series are the simple tortilla and the basket, both symbols of Indigenous peoples particularly renowned for their basket-weaving techniques and the long-standing eating habits they shared...Baskets are usually made out of natural materials such as wood, grass, or animal remains. But in Undocumented Tortilla Basket (2008), an empty basket made of barbed wire, aluminum, and steel wire evoked the unnatural experience of the US-Mexico borderland: a territory plunged in pain and disavowal."

    -Clara Roman, "Odio, Flags, the Sacred, and a Different American in Consuelo Jimenez Underwood's Fiber Art," Consuelo Jimenez Underwood: Art, Weaving, Vision, Duke University Press, 2022

  • Mi Oro, Tu Amor, translating to 'my gold, your love,' Mexico is visible but barred behind slats of barbed wire...

    Consuelo Jimenez Underwood

    Mi Oro, Tu Amor, 1994

    Painted, wrapped, embroidered, stitched cotton canvas, silk fabric, barbed wire, gold wire, paint, corn, and bean kernels

    48 x 51 in

    121.9 x 129.5 cm

    Mi Oro, Tu Amor, translating to "my gold, your love," Mexico is visible but barred behind slats of barbed wire tightly wrapped with gold. Throughout the canvas, gold thread is embroidered to form a grid, bringing maps and, more acutely, the European plundering of the Americas to mind. Hidden and buried in this work, however, are beans and corn kernels, what Jimenez Underwood calls the "true gift" of the Americas.
  • 'Redefining the practice of weaving, Jimenez Underwood works with repurposed barbed wire, yellow caution tape, safety pins, and plastic bags...

    Consuelo Jimenez Underwood

    C. Jane Run, 2005  

    Silkscreened and pinned. Recycled clothing, safety pins, glass beads

    120 x 204 in

    304.8 x 518.2 cm

    "Redefining the practice of weaving, Jimenez Underwood works with repurposed barbed wire, yellow caution tape, safety pins, and plastic bags and crosses Indigenous, Chicana, European, and Euro-American art practices."

    -Laura E. Pérez and Ann Marie Leimer, Consuelo Jimenez Underwood Art, Weaving, Vision, Duke University Press, 2022

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