Sunland Park: New York

January 23 - March 27, 2021
  • Carlos Rosales-Silva: Sunland Park

  • Ruiz-Healy Art, New York, is delighted to present Carlos Rosales-Silva's first solo show in NYC. A recent MFA graduate from New York City’s School of Visual Arts and a participant in Brooklyn’s Residency Unlimited Program, Rosales-Silva uses an abstract approach to explore the complex identity of the ever-expanding histories of Brown people in the United States. The exhibition, titled Sunland Park, opens on January 27th, 2021, and will be on view until March 27th, 2021.

     

    The title of the exhibit, Sunland Park, hails from the artist’s childhood neighborhood in El Paso, Texas. Named after the local 1950 racetrack, the city of Sunland Park was formed in the 1980s when three neighboring townships incorporated and adopted the name of the racetrack. Sunland Park is home to Mount Cristo Rey, a regional catholic pilgrimage site, and various Indigenous Peoples such as the Tiwa, Manso, and Piro. More recently, the city was thrust into national attention as a highly contested site of the Trump administration’s controversial border wall project. To the artist, Sunland Park provides a contextualization of his own work.

     

    Starting with a concrete source of inspiration such as Mexican stucco construction or hand-painted, plexiglass signs, the work becomes abstracted as the artist moves further away from the source. It is then recalled by color, texture, and line to form an object endowed with layers of significance.

  • “I find abstraction to be a useful tool for navigating the tense states that Brownness often finds itself in, states...
    Carlos Rosales-Silva
     
    Diablo en el Jardin, 2019
     

    Crushed stone, acrylic paint, and acrylic plastic on custom shaped panel

    43 x 29"

    109.2 x 73.7 cm

    “I find abstraction to be a useful tool for navigating the tense states that Brownness often finds itself in, states where we attempt to preserve cultural tradition while assimilating for survival purposes, states where home is experienced in fleeting moments and memory. I believe art-making to be an expansive field where visual communication can attempt to untether from contextual spoken or written language."

     

    - Carlos Rosales-Silva

  • 'Abstraction to me is about trying to remember something. I do a lot of studies when I go home which...
    Carlos Rosales-Silva
     
    La Pulga, 2019
     

    Dyed stones, acrylic paint, and acrylic plastic on custom shaped panel

    22 x 20"
    55.88 x 50.8 in

    "Abstraction to me is about trying to remember something. I do a lot of studies when I go home which up until this year was pretty often...They’re really simple studies and the further I get from home, the longer I'm away, the studies turn into abstractions...I can imagine it as a combination of colors, textures, or shapes."

     

    - Carlos Rosales-Silva

  • “There's a consistent influence of the landscape and architecture and the artists that I grew up along the border of...
    Carlos Rosales-Silva
     
    Fuego en el Cielo, 2019
     

    Dyed stones and acrylic paint on custom panel

    23 x 21"
    58.42 x 53.34 cm

    “There's a consistent influence of the landscape and architecture and the artists that I grew up along the border of Texas, Mexico, and El Paso. I'm constantly looking back at the landscape, looking back at the architecture.”

     

    - Carlos Rosales-Silva

  • Artwork Image: Carlos Rosales-Silva Border Exchange, 2020, Sand in acrylic paint on panel, 18 x 14 x 2 in 45.72 x 35.56 x 5.08 cm
    Carlos Rosales-Silva
     
    Border Exchange, 2020
     

    Sand in acrylic paint on panel

    18 x 14 in
    45.72 x 35.56 cm

    "Mexico City and Monterrey have really beautiful and unique traditions of modernist and post-modernist architecture and that’s the color language I grew up around...Blues, greens, pinks, yellows, purples, as bright as possible turned all the way up...Thinking about challenging combinations is really important to me. Colors that maybe aren’t supposed to work together or are kind of hard to look at. I want to try to figure out a way to make them function or make them beautiful or interesting, make them compelling. It’s a really deep commitment to finding those combinations."

     

    - Carlos Rosales-Silva

  • CARLOS ROSALES-SILVA BORDER EXCHANGE STUDIES, 2020 Sand in acrylic and flashe paint on panel 10 x 8' 25.4 x 20.32...
    CARLOS ROSALES-SILVA
    BORDER EXCHANGE STUDIES, 2020
    Sand in acrylic and flashe paint on panel
    10 x 8"
    25.4 x 20.32 cm
  • Installation Shots

  • Installations and Murals

    By Risa Puleo

    "Born into a family of carpenters and welders, Carlos Rosales-Silva grew up surrounded by  the brightly colored street paintings of a previous generation of Chicano muralists in the El Segundo Barrio of El Raso, Texas, a neighborhood that has been described as an "outdoor museum of the bor­der proletariat." Rosales-Silva marries his family's trade as builders and craftspeople to the Chicano mural tradition by incorporating the grit and texture of stucco and plaster walls into the surface of his abstract paintings, transforming the wall from a support surface to a plane for painting. Murals were adopted by the Chicano Movement from the Mexican muralists David Alfaro Siqueiros, Diego Rivera, and Jose Clemente Orozco, who were themselves influenced by the public accessibility of fresco paintings in churches of the Italian Renaissance and colonial Latin America. Like prints and posters, the other forms employed by Chicano artists from the 1960s to the 1990s, murals were accessible to all who engaged with the public sphere, and they functioned as pedagogical tools for teaching community values. Murals also brought communities  together to participate in their making, as evidenced by the long history of youth programs centered around mural production in Brown communities in Texas, California, and Illinois. In recent years, murals in El Segundo, like some in the Pilsen neighborhood of Chicago and San Francisco's Mission District, as well as those that dot the cityscape of Los Angeles, have been destroyed by gentrification and the homogenized tastes of condominium living. Some of Rosales-Silva's paintings speak directly to the destruction of these murals."

     

    From "Monarchs: Brown and Native Contemporary Artists in the Path of the Butterfly", The Museum of Contemporary Art, 2018

  • About the Artist

    Carlos Rosales-Silva is an artist and educator working and living between New York, NY, and El Paso, Texas. His works are grounded in a practice of painting but often borrow from sculptural and installation methods, existing in the spaces between classification. For the last decade, his studio has focused on research and mediation on the increasing histories of Brown people in the United States. The artist’s works are abstract acts of personal discovery that reveal meaning long after they are completed. In this sense, they are non-textual communications, a meditative and slow way of processing knowledge. In 2018 Rosales-Silva was an artist in residence at Artpace, San Antonio and he is now the Abrons Art Center, New York, NY Visual Artist AIRspace Resident. His artwork has been part of various exhibitions throughout Texas and the United States, including Artpace, San Antonio, TX; Sadie Halie Projects, Minneapolis, MN; MFA Brown Art, Governors Island, NY; and Bemis Center for Contemporary Art, Omaha, NE.