Plurality of Isolations: San Antonio

February 24 - May 22, 2021
  • Plurality of Isolations

    Featuring works by RF Alvarez, Jesse Amado, Jennifer Ling Datchuk, Jenelle Esparza, Barbara Miñarro, Cecilia Paredes, Ethel Shipton, and Carlos Rosales-Silva.

  • Plurality of Isolations touches on the experiences shared by many during the COVID-19 pandemic, political distress, and fragile economic environment. The exhibition is an assemblage of the meditations of these artists who share common themes—separation, upheaval, unrest, and hope for better days to come. These periods of hardship indelibly cast a mark on art and shape the course of art history. Though the COVID-19 crisis has had a severe emotional and economic impact on the artistic community, artists are regrouping and reinventing themselves for this new normal as they have done in past catastrophes and have helped those most afflicted find solace through their work.

  • RF Alvarez
    RF. Alvarez
    A Hundred Years, 2020

    Acrylic, natural earth pigment, and pencil

    48 x 48 in
    121.9 x 121.9 cm

    RF Alvarez

    "I have, over the course of this pandemic, felt an emptying out. Streets emptied, calendars emptied, but so did these allegories I painted. They felt so distant, so intangible, that it almost made no sense to continue painting them. Confronting the world with what it is becomes more important than showing what it is not. These works represent a sampling of that sea-change, how a pandemic affects a studio practice. I’ve moved away from allegory, turned the lens onto the room I dream in rather than the dream itself. What dreams I do paint are distant now, faded, almost coming undone the longer time passes..."

     

    - RF Alvarez

    • Artwork Image: RF. Alvarez, After Tiberius, 2021, titled and dated on the reverse, Acrylic, natural earth pigment on canvas 36 x 48 in 91.4 x 121.9 cm
      RF. Alvarez
      After Tiberius, 2021
      Acrylic, natural earth pigment on canvas
      36 x 48 in
      91.4 x 121.9 cm
    • Artwork Image: RF. Alvarez, But I Remember Walking In Coyoacan With You, 2021, titled and dated on the reverse Acrylic, natural earth pigment, pencil on canvas 48 x 36 in 121.9 x 91.4 cm (7255)
      RF. Alvarez
      But I Remember Walking In Coyoacan With You, 2021
      Acrylic, natural earth pigment, pencil
      48 x 36 in
      121.9 x 91.4 cm
    • Artwork Image: RF. Alvarez, Artifact of Some Small Forgotten Moment, 2020, Signed lower right; also signed, titled and dated on the reverse Acrylic, natural earth pigment, pencil on canvas, 36 x 34 in 91.4 x 86.4 cm (7256)
      RF. Alvarez
      Artifact of Some Small Forgotten Moment, 2020
      Acrylic, natural earth pigment, pencil
      36 x 34 in
      91.4 x 86.4 cm
  • Artwork Image: Jesse Amado, December, 2020, Signed and dated on the reverse Le Corbusier acrylic and burnt flairs on canvas, 30 x 24.5 in 76.2 x 62.2 cm (7259)
    Jesse Amado
    December 2020, 2020

    Le Corbusier acrylic and burnt flairs on canvas

    30 x 24.5 in
    76.2 x 62.2 cm

    Jesse Amado

    "What is art’s function? What does it do for a person? Aristotle told us the function of art is catharsis. When experiencing art you laugh, you cry. You feel pity, fear. You see other’s lives as a reflection of your own. Consequentially the catharsis comes. A cleansing clarity, a feeling of relief and understanding that you carry away with you. Art is an instrument that addresses one’s psychic and social health. Presently, the world requires a catharsis. Certainly, I require it. The work that has emerged reflects an examination of the universal trauma that befalls humanity. Compounded by the political nightmare assault on democracy and civil disintegration confronting us all."

     

    - Jesse Amado

    • Artwork Image: Jesse Amado Manos Ocupadas, 2003, 2020, Signed and dated on the reverse Ink on paper, Le Corbusier acrylic on paper, and wood, 14 x 10 x 1.5 in 35.6 x 25.4 x 3.8 cm (7260)
      Jesse Amado
      Manos Ocupadas, 2003, 2020
      Ink on paper, Le Corbusier acrylic on paper, and wood
      14 x 10 x 1.5 in
      35.6 x 25.4 x 3.8 cm
    • Artwork Image: Jesse Amado, Comming At You, 2020, Signed and dated on the reverse Le Corbusier acrylic on canvas,20 in 50.8 cm (7257)
      Jesse Amado
      Comming At You, 2020
      Le Corbusier acrylic
      20 in
      50.8 cm
    • Jesse Amado Lives Matter (noose), 2020 Synthetic rope, and Plexiglas 40 x 18 x 27 in 101.6 x 45.7 x 68.6 cm
      Jesse Amado
      Lives Matter (noose), 2020
      Synthetic rope, and Plexiglas
      40 x 18 x 27 in
      101.6 x 45.7 x 68.6 cm
  • Jennifer Ling Datchuk
    Jennifer Ling Datchuk
    Flawless, 2021
    Porcelain, blue and white pattern transfer from Jingdezhen, China, on mirror plexiglass
    20 x 16 x 3 in
    50.8 x 40.6 x 7.6 cm

    Jennifer Ling Datchuk

    "My work has always dealt with identity, with the sense of being in-between, an imposter, neither fully Chinese nor Caucasian. I have learned to live with the constant question about my appearance: ‘What are you?’ I change my response depending on my hair, make-up, clothes, what I am doing, where I am at, or what I am eating – who I am at the moment. I find people are rarely satisfied with my answer. I explore this conflict through my chosen media – porcelain, which nods to my Chinese heritage but also represents “pure” white – the white desire I find in both cultures. Bound by these conditions, I stitch together my individual nature, unravel the pressures of conformity, and forever experience pain in search of perfection.”

     

    - Jennifer Ling Datchuk

  • Jenelle Esparza
    Jenelle Esparza
    Through the Threshold, 2020
    Bronze cast spurs attached to brass tubes.
    29 x 17 x 2.5 in
    73.7 x 43.2 x 6.3 cm

    Jenelle Esparza

    "I’m less stressed about time. Less stressed of the time it takes to do something or be somewhere. 

    I’m hopeful not for things to go back to normal, but for things to get moving again in a new way."

     

    - Jenelle Esparza

     

  • Artwork Image :Bárbara Miñarro, It Occurs to Me, 2020, Signed certificate of authenticity Fabric, reclaimed sneakers, and acrylic, 14 x 20 x 10 in 35.6 x 50.8 x 25.4 cm (7266)
    Bárbara Miñarro
    It Occurs to Me, 2020
    Fabric, reclaimed sneakers, and acrylic
    14 x 20 x 10 in
    35.6 x 50.8 x 25.4 cm

    Bárbara Miñarro

    "Working during COVID-19 was a lot at first. The first few months were paralyzing and I did not get much done in my studio. However, during that time I wrote a lot. I wrote phrases and words that stood out to me. From the news, songs, books and even social media. These words gave me a sense of belonging to even empowerment. In recent months, I have slowly come back to my studio to bring some of these words and phrases to life in my artworks. My work during this time has gotten smaller in size and more intimate, I think this is reflective of my time at home."

     

    - Bárbara Miñarro

    • Artwork image: Bárbara Miñarro, For a Limited Time Only, 2020, Signed certificate of authenticity Fabric, oil on canvas and tufted yarn, 14 x 20 x 2 in 35.6 x 50.8 x 5.1 cm (7243)
      Bárbara Miñarro
      For a Limited Time Only, 2020
      Fabric, oil on canvas and tufted yarn
      14 x 20 x 2 in
      35.6 x 50.8 x 5.1 cm
    • Artwork Image: Bárbara Miñarro, Chinga tu sueño Americano, 2020, Signed certificate of authenticity Fabric, reclaimed clothing, and acrylic 14 x 20 x 5 in 35.6 x 50.8 x 12.7 cm (7242)
      Bárbara Miñarro
      Chinga tu sueño Americano, 2020
      Fabric, reclaimed clothing, and acrylic
      14 x 20 x 5 in
      35.6 x 50.8 x 12.7 cm
  • Artwork Image: Cecilia Paredes, Paradise Hands IV, 2020, Photo performance inkjet print, 15.8 x 23.6 in 40 x 60 cm
    Cecilia Paredes
    Paradise Hands IV, 2020
    Photo performance inkjet print
    15.8 x 23.6 in
    40 x 60 cm
    Edition of 5 plus 2 AP

    Cecilia Paredes

    "The front door of my studio is separated from the ER entrance of the University of Pennsylvania Hospital by an open-air car park. 

    This allows me to see and hear again and again, ambulances and helicopters arriving. A constant reminder of the cruel truth of covid-19. 

    During this time, l have worked on four tapestries and some engravings and one sculpture. I am starting a sculpture in glass right now, fragility is in my mind.

    These works are all under a series title called The Swan Song series. A title that has reference to the unavoidable reminder of the presence of death during the pandemic."

     

    - Cecilia Paredes

     

    • Cecilia Paredes Magnolia Stories, 2020 Photo performance inkjet print 21 x 32 in Edition of 7 plus 3 AP
      Cecilia Paredes
      Magnolia Stories, 2020
      Photo performance inkjet print
      21 x 32 in
      Edition of 7 plus 3 AP
    • Cecilia Paredes Allegory, 2020 Photo performance inkjet print 19 x 22 in 48.3 x 55.9 cm Edition of 5 plus 2 AP
      Cecilia Paredes
      Allegory, 2020
      Photo performance inkjet print
      19 x 22 in
      48.3 x 55.9 cm
      Edition of 5 plus 2 AP
  • Artwork Image: Carlos Rosales-Silva, Diablito, 2021,Flashe on linen, 12 x 9 x 2.5 in 30.5 x 22.9 x 6.3 cm
    Carlos Rosales-Silva
    Diablito, 2021
    Flashe on linen
    12 x 9 x 2.5 in
    30.5 x 22.9 x 6.3 cm

    Carlos Rosales-Silva

    "A residue of the pandemic happening in New York City has been that commercial rents plummeted, which meant that I was able to move into a studio for rent that wouldn't have been possible previously. Immediately I was able to get a studio and keep working, and that's what has kept me grounded throughout this time. However, the pandemic has affected my community in New York really deeply. It’s put people out of work, and it’s made it harder for working class artists to work in order to survive. So many artist-run spaces have closed here, which are some of my favorite places in the city. But artists are such creative people—we figure things out. We know how to adapt and improvise. Just like always, we have to get creative."

     

    - Carlos Rosales-Silva

    • Carlos Rosales-Silva Bomba, 2020 Flashe on linen 12 x 9 x 1in 30.5 x 22.9 x 2.5 cm
      Carlos Rosales-Silva
      Bomba, 2020
      Flashe on linen
      12 x 9 x 1in
      30.5 x 22.9 x 2.5 cm
    • Carlos Rosales-Silva Fall Leaf, 2020 Flashe on linen 12 x 9 x 1in 30.5 x 22.9 x 2.5 cm
      Carlos Rosales-Silva
      Fall Leaf, 2020
      Flashe on linen
      12 x 9 x 1in
      30.5 x 22.9 x 2.5 cm
    • Artwork Image: Carlos Rosales-Silva, Cuernitos , 2020, Flashe on linen, 12 x 9 x 1 in 30.5 x 22.9 x 2.5 cm
      Carlos Rosales-Silva
      Cuernitos , 2020
      Flashe on linen
      12 x 9 x 1in
      30.5 x 22.9 x 2.5 cm
  • Ethel Shipton
    Ethel Shipton
    La Frontera 1845, 2020
    Archival digital print on Hahnemuhle paper
    30 x 40 in
    76.2 x 101.6 cm
    Edition of 10

    Ethel Shipton

    "During COVID-19 we’ve all learned to live with less. Less contact, less connection, many people with less food, less money, and sadly many with less family and friends in their lives...I am optimistic that the world can change for the better, I keep thinking that Life is never what you can see."

     

    - Ethel Shipton

  • Artists

    • Jesse Amado

      Jesse Amado

    • Jennifer Ling Datchuk

      Jennifer Ling Datchuk

    • Artwork Image: Cecilia Paredes Blue Flight, 2021, Photo performance inkjet print, 46.75 x 36 in 118.7 x 91.4 cm

      Cecilia Paredes

    • Artwork: Ethel Shipton, Ha (Listening to Berlin Series), 2019, Screenprint, 30 x 22.5", 2 / 10

      Ethel Shipton

    • Artwork Image: Carlos Rosales-Silva, Diablo en el Jardin, 2019, Crushed stone, acrylic paint, and acrylic plastic on custom shaped panel, 43 x 29", 109.2 x 73.7 cm

      Carlos Rosales-Silva

    • RF Alvarez

      RF Alvarez

      Born in San Antonio and currently working in Austin, Texas, Alvarez has been interested in the intermixing of Mexican and Anglo-Western identities that occur in his environment and his own personal heritage. This has manifested in an approach to his craft that is in constant conversation with art historical and archeological references. He often applies titling that evokes mythological narrative, tapping into stories that have woven into the fabric of western society, and combines this with a depiction of bodies and spaces that are at once anonymous and succinct. What results is an exploration of identity from a teleological perspective: a visual language that is so historical in its blending that it can come to represent a potential future.

    • Jenelle Esparza

      Jenelle Esparza

      Jenelle Esparza is an interdisciplinary artist who was born in the coastal city of Corpus Christi, TX. 

      Esparza examines the lesser-known history of cotton and labor in South Texas through photography and textiles and incorporates concepts of body movement, history, gender, identity, culture, and race. Her recent projects consider the intersections of Mexican and American culture and the implications of generational trauma. In El Color de la Obra (2016), Esparza used photography, two-way mirrors, and bronze cotton plants to examine the interconnected histories of South Texas cotton fields and began her exploration into this history which runs several generations deep in her family.

    • Bárbara Miñarro

      Bárbara Miñarro

      Barbara Miñarro was born in Monterrey, México, and currently lives and works in San Antonio, Texas. As an artist influenced and living between two cultures, Miñarro’s work explores ideas of the body in migration. Her soft sculptures, installations, and paintings utilize the tactile memory of clothing, the earth, and the physical body to express the emotional journey of immigration.