E La Nave Va: San Antonio

June 9 - August 14, 2021
  • E La Nave Va

    Featuring works by Fernando Andrade, Richard Armendariz, Cecilia Biagini, Nate Cassie, Ana Fernandez, Leigh Anne Lester, César A. Martínez, Cristina Muñiz, and Mark Schlesinger.
  • In Italian, the phrase E la nave va translates literally to "And the ship sails on."However, it can be understood in a more philosophical context to mean that, in spite of everything, life goes on. Taken from Federico Fellini's 1983 surrealist film, and the title of Cecilia Biagini's recent painting, E La Nave Va encapsulates the strangeness of the past months as the COVID-19 pandemic appears to reach its denouement. The exhibition expresses the collective over-thinking, daydreaming, and fantasizing that, for better or worse, accompanies our changeable future as life goes on. E La Nave Va features artists of the gallery program not included in the previous exhibition Plurality of Isolations, and three guest artists, bringing familiar and new perspectives to the role of art during periods of uncertainty.

  • Artwork Image: Fernando Andrade, Espacio #80, 2021, Acrylic on canvas, 30 x 30 x 2 in 76.2 x 76.2 x 5.1 cm (7335)
    Fernando Andrade
    Espacio #80, 2021
    Acrylic on canvas
    30 x 30 in
    76.2 x 76.2 cm

    Fernando Andrade

    "I recall the feeling of uneasiness every night before bed. Staring at statistics and news in April of 2020 caused deep anxiety, stress, and heartache. It was frightening to see numbers rise for 'Total Cases', 'Newly Reported', and 'Total Deaths'. I would meticulously search from countries to states in the U.S., then finally narrow it to cities. I would stay awake at the thought that those numbers could include my family at some point. During that time, the only outlet was my studio. Staying active and focusing on colorful, improvised abstract painting helped me channel the world around me as I attempted to heal my state of mind."

     

    - Fernando Andrade

  • Richard Armendariz
    Richard Armendariz
    Do Not Count Us Out, 2021
    Woodblock print
    21.5 x 21.5 in
    54.6 x 54.6 cm
    Edition of 10

    Richard Armendariz

    "Do Not Count Us Out is referential of Baroque and Moche ceremonial vessels.  Flowers, full of significance and meaning, are given at the beginning and at the end of our lives, at our births and at our passing's. The rainbow trout vase is filled with lilies and philodendron plants as well as emperor butterflies and sphinx moths. The text has a multiplicity of meanings ranging from the cries of protestors in the streets to the last words of wisdom from a loved one.

     

    "Point of No Return depicts a promethean coyote and his compatriots are running away with the knowledge personified by fire. The work references all the political, racial, and socio-economic inequalities that exist in society. The truth is out of the bottle, our eyes are open, and we can no longer pretend it doesn’t exist...."

     

    - Richard Armendariz

    • Artwork Image:  Richard Armendariz, Muro Hopper, 2020, pencil Woodblock print 24 x 30 in 61 x 76.2 cm
      Richard Armendariz
      Muro Hopper, 2020
      Woodblock print
      24 x 30 in
      61 x 76.2 cm
      Edition of 5
    • Artwork Image: Richard Armendariz, Point of No Return, 2020, numbered lower left in pencil Woodblock print, 21.5 x 21.5 in 54.6 x 54.6 cm Edition of 10 (7033)
      Richard Armendariz
      Point of No Return, 2020
      Woodblock print
      21.5 x 21.5 in
      54.6 x 54.6 cm
      Edition of 10
  • Artwork Image: Cecilia Biagini, E la nave va, 2020, Acrylic on canvas, 40 x 66 in 101.6 x 167.6 cm (7139)
    Cecilia Biagini
    E la nave va, 2020
    Acrylic on canvas
    40 x 66 in
    101.6 x 167.6 cm

    Cecilia Biagini

    E la nave va, 'And the ship sails on' - after Fellini, is about construction and the unpredictability of paint to transmit motion.

    Forms inside other forms, forms that build up into geometry of the space, opening up into another plane or to the contrary decompose into one another.

    The chaotic scene and the harmonious tune of the line.

    The uncertainty was the state of the world and the vision of the future.

    Learning the need for synthesis, dematerialization, and the continuous navigation of the paradox of our existence.

    This is the Full Meaning of Art.

     

    - Cecilia Biagini

    • Artwork Image: Cecilia Biagini, Full Meaning, 2021, Acrylic on canvas 10.5 x 16 in 26.7 x 40.6 cm (7331)
      Cecilia Biagini
      Full Meaning, 2021
      Acrylic on canvas
      10.5 x 16 in
      26.7 x 40.6 cm
  • Artwork Image: Nate Cassie, Roman Bench, 2021, Longleaf pine and ash, 13 x 77 x 19 in 33.02 x 195.58 x 48.26 cm (7365)
    Nate Cassie
    Twin vessels with a landscape reflecting the moon, 2021
    Black stoneware with white slip and crackle glaze
    17 x 14 x 14 in each
    43.18 x 35.56 x 35.56 cm
     
    and
     
    Roman Bench, 2021
    Longleaf pine and ash
    13 x 77 x 19 in
    33.02 x 195.58 x 48.26 cm

    Nate Cassie

    "I started creating the furniture in the early days of the pandemic as a way to slow down and focus my energy on something that was new and exploratory. The pieces are made almost exclusively with hand tools and inspired by vernacular furniture designs.

     

    "The five ceramic vessels are the newest things that I have made...To me they are like mountain tops in the clouds - atmospheric and also weathered. They also are geological like something dug from the earth. They are in part inspired by the snowstorm and freeze we had this last year...The vessels are vase forms like one might use to display a large floral arrangement, but they are empty which speaks of loss or mourning."

     

    - Nate Cassie

    • Artwork Image: Nate Cassie, Only slowly do the rays of the sun drive away the night and usher in a new day, 2021, Black stoneware with white slip and crackle glaze, 17 x 15 x 15 in 43.18 x 38.10 x 38.10 cm (7346)
      Nate Cassie
      Only slowly do the rays of the sun drive away the night and usher in a new day, 2021
      Black stoneware with white slip and crackle glaze
      17 x 15 x 15 in
      43.18 x 38.10 x 38.10 cm
       
      and
       
      Cricket Table, 2021
      Pine with shou sugi ban finish
      20 in diameter x 24 in
      50.80 x 60.96 cm
    • Artwork Image: Nate Cassie, Staked Work Table, 2021 Poplar, pine, and ash with milk paint and oil finish 23 x 52 x 30 in 58.4 x 132.1 x 76.2 cm (7367)
      Nate Cassie
      Twin vessels for the ghosts of what was lost, 2021
      Stoneware, white slip, nuka ash glaze and Kuan crackle glaze
      14 x 11 x 11 in
      35.6 x 27.9 x 27.9 cm
       
      and
       
      Staked Work Table, 2021
      Poplar, pine, and ash with milk paint and oil finish
      23 x 52 x 30 in
      58.4 x 132.1 x 76.2 cm
  • Artwork Image: Ana Fernandez, Vendors, 2021, Watercolor and gouache on paper, 18 x 24 in 45.7 x 61 cm (7344)
    Ana Fernandez
    Vendors, 2021
    Watercolor and gouache on paper
    18 x 24 in
    45.7 x 61 cm

    Ana Fernandez

    "We’re all subject to the laws of gravity and like a river cutting into the earth and making its path, so do we. The line of demarcation that separates before/after the pandemic is stark and remains etched in my mind like a high water mark after a flood. One day we will be far enough away from this catastrophe to wonder how we survived in those high waters, but for now I will continue to move forward and not look back."

     

    - Ana Fernandez

    •   Artwork Image: Ana Fernandez, Associates, 2021, Watercolor and gouache on paper, 18 x 24 in 45.7 x 61 cm (7350)
      Ana Fernandez
      Associates, 2021
      Watercolor and gouache on paper
      18 x 24 in
      45.7 x 61 cm
  • Artwork Image: Leigh Anne Lester, Blind Diversification #1, 2020, Graphite on paper, acrylic paint on drafting film and acrylic paint on linen tape, 16.25 x 16.25 in 41.3 x 41.3 cm (7170)
    Leigh Anne Lester
    Blind Diversification #1, 2020
    Graphite on paper, acrylic paint on drafting film and acrylic paint on linen tape
    16.25 x 16.25 in
    41.3 x 41.3 cm

    Leigh Anne Lester

    "Art making in a compulsive act. I couldn’t help but keep making things but the longer the pandemic wore on, the more untethered I felt to things in the past or to the future for that matter. I found I started new things in materials that I don’t traditionally use...I also went back and did what was  known to me in my work. Sampling from previous pieces to creating a new iteration. The fortunate thing in this act was that my whole body of work is a slow motion animation of change. How perfectly that felt  for our times...They are accidental reflections for how I felt being away from most folks. It gave me a sense of newness that felt like moving forward."

     

    - Leigh Anne Lester

  • Artwork Image: César A. Martínez, Fulana, 2021,  Graphite on Stonehenge paper, 15 x 11 in 38.1 x 27.9 cm
    César A. Martínez
    Fulana, 2021
    Graphite on Stonehenge paper
    15 x 11 in
    38.1 x 27.9 cm

    César A. Martínez

    "It never occurred to me until now that all my professional life I have worked and lived as if there were a pandemic out there. The word isolation is not really part of my thinking process..."

     

    - César A. Martínez

    • Artwork Image: César A. Martínez, Veterano (white tie), 2021, Graphite on Stonehenge paper, 15 x 11 in 38.1 x 27.9 cm (7292)
      César A. Martínez
      Veterano (white tie), 2021
      Graphite on Stonehenge paper
      15 x 11 in
      38.1 x 27.9 cm
  • Artwork Image: Cristina Muñiz, Ode to Vessel, 2021x, Oil on panel, 8 x 8 x 1.5 in 20.3 x 20.3 x 3.8 cm (7337)
    Cristina Muñiz
    Ode to Vessel, 2021
    Oil on panel
    8 x 8 in
    20.3 x 20.3 cm

    Cristina Muñiz

    "When the pandemic hit, I was feeling the best that I had ever felt in my adult life. In many ways, I believe the pandemic helped me be comfortable with slowing down...The work began with a series titled Outside Artists Windows. Most were inspired by what was outside my window, but others were inspired by the act of walking with my dog, experiencing a new level of health. The pandemic slowed things down just enough for me to be comfortable in what work I could produce physically."

     

    - Cristina Muñiz

     

     

    • Artwork Image: Cristina Muñiz, "Watchaté", 2021, Painted Paper Sakura Marker Oil On Canvas, 24 X 24 X 1 5 In 61 X 61 X 3 8 Cm
      Cristina Muñiz
      Watchaté, 2021
      Painted paper, Sakura marker, oil on canvas
      24 x 24 in
      61 x 61 cm
    • Artwork Image: Cristina Muñiz, Organized Pain, 2020, Crayon, Sakura marker on paper, 12 x 9 in 30.5 x 22.9 cm (7338)
      Cristina Muñiz
      Organized Pain, 2020
      Crayon, Sakura marker on paper
      12 x 9 in
      30.5 x 22.9 cm
  • Artwork Image: Mark Schlesinger, some lovely presence suddenly declared, 2021, Acrylic canvas and wood, 36 x 30 in 91.4 x 76.2 cm (7352)
    Mark Schlesinger
    Wonder at 14, 2020
    Pencil and ink on paper
    30 x 22 in
    76.2 x 55.9 cm

    Mark Schlesinger

    "I entered the hospital for a short stay in mid-February. Elise and I traveled to Boston for almost a week in early March. On March 11, we came home and locked the door. 409 days later, I go out and to the market. I cannot see that the avocados are hard and the potatoes are bruised."

     

    - Mark Schlesinger

  • Featured Artists

    • Richard 'Ricky' Armendariz

      Richard "Ricky" Armendariz

    • Artwork: Cecilia Biagini, Pianoforte (Combined), 2018, Acrylic on wood, 27 x 28 x 7"

      Cecilia Biagini

    • Nate Cassie

      Nate Cassie

    • Artwork: Leigh Anne Lester, Splice sidle 1, 2015, Color pencil, hand-cut drafting film, acrylic, 10 x 10"

      Leigh Anne Lester

    • Artwork Image: César A. Martínez, Red Macias, 2016, Acrylic on canvas, 54 x 44" 137.2 x 111.8 cm

      César A. Martínez

    • Artwork Image: Mark Schlesinger, Like This One, Like That One, 2020 Acrylic, canvas and wood, 55 x 36" 139.7 x 91.4 cm

      Mark Schlesinger

    • Artwork Image: Fernando Andrade, Espacio #80, 2021, Acrylic on canvas, 30 x 30 in 76.2 x 76.2 cm (7335)

      Fernando Andrade

      Fernando Andrade was born in the border town of Acuña, MX, and relocated at age seven to San Antonio, TX. As an artist, Andrade works in two distinct bodies of work: representational drawings and abstract paintings. In his drawings, simple narratives are created by using figures and objects to explore current sociopolitical events or personal family stories, as portrayed in the series La Patria. In contrast, his abstract paintings are improvised and organic colorful compositions. He views the process as therapeutic, allowing himself to imagine space, arrangement, and rhythmic affinities, which to him celebrate life itself.

       

    • Artwork Image: Ana Fernandez, Vendors, 2021, signed, titled, dated on reverse Watercolor and gouache on paper 18 x 24 in 45.7 x 61 cm (7344)

      Ana Fernandez

      Ana Fernandez is a San Antonio-based painter who creates enigmatic street scenes exploring the diverse landscapes of Latino communities of South Texas. “Though I paint urban landscapes in the realist tradition, my interests are not simply formal: my paintings attempt to capture the cultural, psychological, and spiritual realms of these singular sights that surround me. In this light, a car or pickup truck can represent aspirations of physical and social mobility, while a neon mannequin bride casts a long (painted) shadow as the feminine protagonist in a silent film that unfolds through my windshield.”

    • Artwork Image: Cristina Muñiz, Ode to Vessel, 2021, Oil on panel, 8 x 8 in 20.3 x 20.3 cm (7337)

      Cristina Muñiz

      Muñiz’s work draws from the concept of ownership and memories drawn from storytelling, experiences that cemented themselves visually into the artist’s mind, and interactions with people she has met along her path. She is interested in ownership of any object or concept, whether it’s land, homes, objects, or stories, and how these are handed down over generations. The act of exchanging intrigues the artist, along with the dynamic of “keeping it within the family.”