Contemporary Latinx and Latin American Printmakers: New York

September 28 - November 4, 2022
  • CONTEMPORARY LATINX AND LATIN AMERICAN PRINTMAKERS

  • Contemporary Latinx and Latin American Printmakers is comprised of artists from various generations who work in a range of printmaking techniques such as lithographs, woodblock printing, etchings with aquatint, serigraphs, and photogravure. Works by Rodolfo Morales, Juan Dios Mora, and Liliana Porter take on a dreamlike, surrealistic nature in their prints. Juan Dios Mora states that devices he illustrates in his works "show the ingenuity and capability of the characters and their will to survive. The intention is to make a social comment on a culture that frequently must rely on their surroundings to survive. The goal is to portray the symbolism of these devices, which means a lot to each character. Above all, the devices portray the freedom, hope and style of the crafty owners, which will last forever." Celia Álvarez Muñoz, Ethel Shipton, and Alejandro Diaz focus on text-based works. Álvarez Muñoz's work addresses the dichotomy of living between two cultures. Common themes in her practice include: Catholicism, Mexican American experience, the past versus the present and English versus Spanish language. Work by Pedro Diego Alvarado-Rivera focuses on still life that depict the limitless abundance of the Mexican natural world. Romanticism for the American landscape and the blend of Mexican, American, and indigenous cultures influence the content of Richard Armendariz. 

    • César A. Martínez Bato Azul, 1986 Editioned lower left, signed lower right 4-color Lithograph 30 x 22 in 76.2 x 55.9 cm AP 3 of 4
      César A. Martínez
      Bato Azul, 1986
      Editioned lower left, signed lower right
      4-color Lithograph
      30 x 22 in
      76.2 x 55.9 cm
      AP 3 of 4
    • Juan de Dios Mora Montando a la Escoba Voladora (Riding the Flying Broom), 2010 Linocut 22 x 30 in 55.9 x 76.2 cm Edition of 20
      Juan de Dios Mora
      Montando a la Escoba Voladora (Riding the Flying Broom), 2010
      Linocut
      22 x 30 in
      55.9 x 76.2 cm
      Edition of 20
    • Moses Ros Sancochito Sabrosón, 2012 Etching aquatint print 9 x 9 in 22.9 x 22.9 cm A/P
      Moses Ros
      Sancochito Sabrosón, 2012
      Etching aquatint print
      9 x 9 in
      22.9 x 22.9 cm
      A/P
    • Richard 'Ricky' Armendariz The Reluctant Leader II (blue), 2021 Signed in image lower right, numbered lower left, in pencil Woodblock print 20.9 x 20.9 in 53 x 53 cm Edition of 10 (Edition record)
      Richard 'Ricky' Armendariz
      The Reluctant Leader II (blue), 2021
      Signed in image lower right, numbered lower left, in pencil
      Woodblock print
      20.9 x 20.9 in
      53 x 53 cm
      Edition of 10
      (Edition record)
  • 'Therapy was talking to family and friends growing up. The idea of talking to someone is the polar opposite of...
    Richard 'Ricky' Armendariz
    Ya me voy a therapy (Blue), 2015
    Woodblock print
    36 x 48 in
    91.4 x 121.9 cm
    Edition of 2
    "Therapy was talking to family and friends growing up. The idea of talking to someone is the polar opposite of machismo attitudes about mental and physical health. I find humor to be an excellent way of dealing with that difficult subject."-Ricky Armendariz
  • Patssi Valdez's paintings and graphics are brightly colored and often emotive with a sense of magical realism woven in. A...
    Patssi Valdez
    Forbidden Fruit, 1991
    Litograph
    37.8 x 26"
    95.9 x 66 cm
    30 / 100
    Patssi Valdez's paintings and graphics are brightly colored and often emotive with a sense of magical realism woven in.  A Chicano art icon, Valdez has been internationally recognized for her pioneering artwork that uses magic realism to reject negative representations of the Latinx community.The artist states, “Nothing in the world is static. Nothing is solid. Everything is always in flux and in motion.”​​​​​​​​
  • “There would be no modernism without the cultural work of indigenous peoples and there would be no modern world without...
    Carlos Rosales-Silva
    Puros Exitos Vol. 2, 2022
    Screenprint
    15 x 12 in
    38.1 x 30.5 cm
    Edition of 10 plus 1 artist's proof

    “There would be no modernism without the cultural work of indigenous peoples and there would be no modern world without the labor, wealth, and life siphoned from North America by colonizers. While this concept is challenging to represent in modular paintings, especially abstract paintings, a practice of citation is not difficult. My work runs parallel to the established art historical cannon; deeply indebted to the artists, artisans, and craftspeople of the American Southwest and Mexico as much as it is to any established and codified art historical cannon.”

     

    -Carlos Rosales-Silva

  • “As a result of growing up in San Antonio, Sánchez has been fascinated with railroads. Her family lived a few...
    Marta Sánchez
    San Antonio Train Yard, 1998
    Serigraph
    22 x 30 in
    55.9 x 76.2 cm
    Edition 31 of 48

    “As a result of growing up in San Antonio, Sánchez has been fascinated with railroads. Her family lived a few blocks from the large train yards of San Antonio’s Eastside, and she often watched trains come and go from her family porch. As a child, she also admired the train track patterns and the hundreds of trains gathered at the railyards daily. “There I would draw the landscape full of trains and wonder about their departures and arrivals.”

     

    -Marta Sánchez, Dr. Ricardo Romo, “The Life and Art of Marta Sánchez: Impressions of Chicana Culture, Tradition, and Memory”, La Prensa, Texas, 2022

    • Marta Sánchez La Casa de Sra. Blanca Estela, 2015 Signed, titled, dated, and numbered on recto Serigraph 15 x 20.3 in 38.1 x 51.6 cm Edition of 26
      Marta Sánchez
      La Casa de Sra. Blanca Estela, 2015
      Signed, titled, dated, and numbered on recto
      Serigraph
      15 x 20.3 in
      38.1 x 51.6 cm
      Edition of 26
    • Cisco Jiménez Quetzalcoapunk, 2016 Etching 18 x 17.5 in 45.7 x 44.5 cm Edition of 40
      Cisco Jiménez
      Quetzalcoapunk, 2016
      Etching
      18 x 17.5 in
      45.7 x 44.5 cm
      Edition of 40
    • Alejandro Diaz Fabuloso Lavender, 2014 Signed and numbered lower right Archival color print on German etching paper 47 x 36.5 in 119.4 x 92.7 cm Edition of 10 plus 2 AP
      Alejandro Diaz
      Fabuloso Lavender, 2014
      Signed and numbered lower right
      Archival color print on German etching paper
      47 x 36.5 in
      119.4 x 92.7 cm
      Edition of 10 plus 2 AP
    • Modesto Bernardo Memoria Negra, 1994 Signed, titled and numbered on recto Linoleum 14 x 15.5 in 35.6 x 39.4 cm Edition 19 of 20
      Modesto Bernardo
      Memoria Negra, 1994
      Signed, titled and numbered on recto
      Linoleum
      14 x 15.5 in
      35.6 x 39.4 cm
      Edition 19 of 20
  • Contemporary Latinx and Latin American Printmakers celebrates not only the various forms of printmaking, but the personal history, heritage, and style of the participating artists themselves. Selected prints showcase themes ranging from Latin American history, anthropomorphism, surrealist scenery, political commentary, and reflections on the artists' cultural past. The exhibition features a wide variety of printing techniques, including woodblock prints, silkscreens, etchings, and serigraphs. Although the artists vary in technique and design style, their prints work cohesively in creating a new understanding of what it means to be a Latinx and Latin American printmaker.
     
     Ruiz-Healy Art is proud to include the works of: César A. Martínez, Alejandro Diaz, Juan de Dios Mora, Richard 'Ricky' Armendariz, Moses Ros, Pedro Friedeberg, Patssi Valdez, Johanna Calle, Jose Luis Cuevas, Liliana Porter, Michael Menchaca, Francisco Toledo, Carlos Amorales, Vicente Rojo, Rodolfo Morales, Dr. Lakra, Modesto Bernardo, Ethel Shipton, Celia Álvarez Muñoz, Roger Von Gunten, Pedro Diego Alvarado-Rivera, Carlos Rosales-Silva, Marta Sánchez, and Cisco Jiménez. Contemporary Latinx and Latin American Printmakers will be on view  at Ruiz-Healy Art in New York City until November 4, 2022.